Asymmetric Universe - Band

Review: Asymmetric Universe – When Reality Disarticulates

Like the supercollider, Asymmetric Universe seek to smash two dissimilar things together and see what the results are. Naturally, and experiment by mad scientists and composers coming from the home of La Vecchia Signora (google it!) to combine jazz fusion and metal into one would of course create some explosive outcomes. Not to mention some pretty phenomenal musical pieces.

“When Reality Disarticulates” is a debut EP by Asymmetric Universe, and it’s here now and ready to take you to unparalleled heights. Look to the skies: that is where the trio is going to take you.

For a totally instrumental release, this thing is four tracks of expansive, experimental and wholly gripping fusion music. Take EP opener “Trees Houses Hills” for a fine example: starting off so minimally, guitars and cymbals meekly registering their presence in the room before their flamboyance bounds forth from them with a burst of self-confidence.

When Reality Disarticulates

If there is one enduring thing to take away from listening to this release, it’s that experimentation is the key to success: be it “Hermeneutic Shock’s” flowing, flying musical escapology, “Off the Beaten Track” Holdsworthian chemistry, or “The Clouds Passing By’s” otherworldly, ethereal ambience leading to space explorations. Everything on show here is made to play with the musical form and to evoke a response from your mind. And Asymmetric Universe’s music is what makes you want to explore.

My pick would have to be the third piece “Off the Beaten Track,” clocking in at some six and a half minutes. It’s frantic, for one thing: everyone is really laying down some serious licks on this, striving for the very best in their playing abilities and pulling it off with aplomb. Masterful work and a treasure for any fan of the indefinable yet oddly marvelous.

To say what Asymmetric Universe have done is prog is inaccurate; to say that it is metal is too vague. Rather, they have thrown into “When Reality Disarticulates” all their passions, excitements and inspirations and cooked up something that is beyond compare. This is music without boundaries, without barricades and without limits.

The EP is available from Bandcamp. Follow Asymmetric Universe on Facebook and Instagram.

In The Fire

Review: In The Fire – Volatile Beings

So-called prolific artists, at least within the scope of heavy metal, tend to fall into the dime-a-dozen category, often releasing large bodies of work but with very little actual quality to be found within. This requires a lot of legwork and listening to mediocre-to-outright boring music just to find something worth its time. As with any rule, however, there are exceptions. And Philly’s blackened death metal savants In The Fire are a shining example of such an exception. There is a certain level of quality consistent throughout the band debut full-length release Volatile Beings that makes exploring it an engaging experience and not a chore in the slightest.

In The Fire - Volatile Beings

Without warning, “Feral” flings its serrated hooks from the darkness and drags its victim deep into its twisted world of terror. Instantly noticeable on this journey through hells unknown is the almost ridiculously modern production. Rather than relying on haphazard production to add character to the music, the production is domineered with sadomasochistic control. Sterility is often a negative term, but in this case it’s the sterility of a surgical scalpel, gleaming in the florescent lights of the morgue as the first cut glides through cold flesh, opening the abyss that pulls its prey into the guts. The tremolo riffs swirl around the churning, steady pacing of the drums in a doom-laden groove before opening up into all-out death metal fury. The leads aren’t so much leads as they are controlled noise, screeching and wailing their way over the seemingly bottomless maw of low end. Ryan Moll’s (vocals, guitars, bass, keys) obsession with control is apparent here as well, as on repeat listens it becomes quite evident that there is method to the racket; the cries of feedback are crafted into subtle yet memorable hooks.

The leads aren’t always as noisy, but they do play a large part in creating the atmosphere that is so key to Volatile Beings. On “The Devil in the Mirror” there are moments of haunting, spaced out arpeggios that lie beneath the thunderous riffing like shadows in the dark. There’s an almost epic feel at play here as In The Fire do indeed feel like it’s rising above the weak, feeble masses in a display of the complete and total power of an unearthly monstrosity. The rhythm section, completed with Patrick Battaglia on drums, bulges with might, locking into the groove like the inescapable constraint of an anaconda the size of an oil pipeline.

The onslaught doesn’t relent until the opening passage on “Into Battle” that ends with an unexpected, almost melodeath riff at the end, making for a refreshing take. The instrumental title track lurks its way in, building and pulsing before dropping into a lurking bit of doom as it coils before striking out with sinister precision. In The Fire layer on plenty of effects and production tricks that drip like virulent venom over the body of the beast, continuing its merciless assault of riffing. “Techno-Sociopathic De-Evolution” fully harnesses control of the melodic riffs, this time striking straight for the kill like a cunning predator who will not make the same mistake twice.

Needless to say, In The Fire’s Volatile Beings only strengthens the confidence to be had in the band’s ability to deliver. Ryan Moll simply understands extreme metal, and has a way of adapting the core of a style and distinctly making it his own. Not only does Volatile Beings shine as an instant highlight, but among the neverending slew of death metal at large as well.

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Endworld Halos album art

Review: Endworld Halos – S/T

One of the most gratifying aspects of exploring music is to be able to see how different bands, styles, and scenes interact with each other. Like a massive, breathing network, no band is an island, and every city is its own musical melting pot. Today, my gaze shifts to the city of Kuopio in Finland, home of a progressive rock trio Endworld Halos who have recently released their self-titled debut album.

It feels that Endworld Halos took time to produce an album that is well planned, well thought and well executed. “Endworld Halos” is an epic journey that is comprised of ten songs. Hearing the band place an emphasis on this kind of tried-and-tested longform composition is impressive. The band’s natural talents with writing, matched with the encyclopaedic interest in the genre make the least involving moments on the album a joy to behold.

While they never fully swing into prog territory, keeping their sights mixed on relatively conventional songwriting, the music is significantly flashier than the sort you’d usually expect in a purely melodic act. Endworld Halos boost their hooks with exotic instrumentation and plenty of dynamic changes. Even if the album aims to hit a lot of the same marks as conventional melodic rock, I seldom feel like I have their approach “figured out.” They take a conventional palette and harness it in a way that sounds unpredictable.

Endworld Halos offer some great songwriting—by the end of the first listen, I was impressed to realize several of the tracks already stood out in my memory. The opening, “Adjusting to Life” features great riffs. “Desperado Sundown,” one of the most crucial numbers on the album features such an amazing instrumentation that will definitely have the old school proggers give the band thumbs up; the band’s performance is impressive across the board. The music is intelligently arranged, giving some extra meat to the bones of the already-good songwriting.

“Endworld Halos” is a record that challenges and provokes. If anything, it’s that quality that makes the album among the best this band has ever done, and definitely one of the best efforts to be released in 2018.

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fayne-02

Review: Fayne – Journals

Hailing from Montreal, Fayne have been around since 2004. In the period from 204 until 2008 the band put out two EP releases, “You Took It All Away” (2004) and “Delivering the Final Blow” (2016), before they went on a hiatus in 2008. Five years later Fayne regrouped and in 2014 they launched their third EP “The Queen of Kings.” Last year Fayne returned with their debut full-length album entitled “Journals.”

Fayne play a brand of djent/progressive metal, combining ambient elements and delicately played clean layers over top of the stuttering and stabbing rhythms set in place by Meshuggah and SikTh. The difference is, the music feels much more lush and organic, setting themselves apart from the very mechanical sounding contemporaries who follow a similar formula. While the melodic djent thing isn’t new, Fayne manage to sound unique and fresh, thanks to the atmospheres and singing.

The vocal work, courtesy of Justin Furtado, on “Journals” is superb. The soaring vocal melodies and lyrics will definitely embed themselves in your memory. The screaming vocals are few and far between, but when they show up, they are in the right place.

Fayne - Journals

The guitar work is split between the dry and low polyrhythmic chugs and clean and melodic layering for ambiance. These two styles fit together in perfect harmony and create some wonderful soundscapes and textures. The bass is also very present in the mix, which is an added touch of brilliance. You can hear it slapping and popping along throughout the album, even taking a few moments here and there to be the focal point of the music from time to time. Listen to numbers like the opener “Grimspeak” or “Prototype”, and you’ll catch it. Oh, and the drumming is actually real, which is a nice change of pace for a genre that likes to program everything or play it through an electronic kit. This is one of the contributing factors for the EP not sounding like an overproduced machine.

As for the musical composition, “Journals” does feel like one song and flows through tracks logically when things take a change in pace or theme. Fayne can definitely demand the attention of the listener without having to drop a solo every few minutes. These guys know what they’re doing.

With the release of “Journals”, Fayne have moved out of the periphery (no pun intended) and into focus.

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Endworld Halos

Interview: Endworld Halos

Endworld Halos is a Finnish progressive rock trio who launched their self-titled album in October last year. Kimmo Utriainen answered our questions.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life is great in the cold Finnish periphery, although slightly on the busy side as we speak. I’m active with around 5 bands or projects, recording music with three of them currently, so time is a bit scarce. Other than that, waiting for spring and the annual semi-hibernation to end. Finnish problems.

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Endworld Halos”?

People can expect a highly versatile album that can be easiest described as dark prog. However, the music holds many kinds of tones from dark to luminous, natural / organic to metropolitan / futuristic, all the way to (post-)apocalyptic aural landscapes. A multi-faced creature struggling between optimism and pessimism, our music comes with beauty, roughness and surprise, taking the listener through a vast spectrum of emotions. Thematically speaking, the album can be thought of as a rather bleak one, but then again, I’d let the listener to find out if that really is the case. Although its backbone is in overdriven rock, our music has got its soft spots and certain sensitivity. So there’s a lot of elements hidden in our material for the listener to discover.

Endworld Halos album art

What was it like working on the album?

Personally, this album was really the first I have co-written with someone else (the musical dictator I’ve grown been). Hence, I could say this album was much about personal growth and learning how to merge my musicality with someone else’s. We didn’t set many limitations to what this band would end up being about, so the childlike feeling of everything being possible was the topmost sensation. It’s hard to describe, but that feeling can be very inspiring and liberating. With this mindset as the basis, me and Toni kept bouncing our ideas to each other during those, what, three or four years of writing, until we had an array of songs we were satisfied with. There was a surprisingly little amount of compromise we had to make between the two of us, the final arrangement part being a different case, heh.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Endworld Halos”?

Unfortunately no, as we have decided to focus on being a studio band. We haven’t played one single show, which of course sets its difficulties to making our name heard, but that’s something we have to live with.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

If we toured, I guess there aren’t too many places I wouldn’t play, except maybe some specific backwater locations in our home country, heh. Just to avoid getting stabbed.

Who and what inspires you the most?

The inmost crevasses of my mind, soul and ego that I can access with music only form my primary inspiration. When I grab an instrument and start unfolding a song, it’s not usually a particular emotion or thought I wish to channel, but most often an abstract entity of its own that comes from these inner regions. Musically speaking, I’m fond of older proggy / less generic music and the fact that some people can or have been able to make music like this full time. I just find that thought very inspiring, and it has carried me through projects like “Endworld Halos”, even though I’m not dependent on reaching that status myself. It would be very enjoyable of course. Also, people who do what they please musically and artistically are an inspiration. People like that have always got it right, regardless of the genre.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Metal has been my comfort zone, so influences are bound to come from that direction. On the other hand, I originally learnt to play guitar to the music of the Beatles, the Shadows, the Animals, David Bowie and so forth, so my background is not in metal in the first place. The playing of Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Tony Iommi, Ritchie Blackmore, Steve Howe, Ed Wynne, Petri Walli and Denner / Shermann have definitely opened up most new aspects for me. Right now I’m shuffling weekly recommendations, Neil Young to be more particular. So almost everything goes, except for generic mainstream music. Of late, my ears have gotten a bit tired of noisy music, so I’ve been enjoying more subtle sounding stuff, although I have not turned my back to high gain music either.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Thank you for the interview! Our self-titled album is available on Spotify, Bandcamp etc. as well as on CD that comes with a beautiful 12-page booklet with colorful photography and lyrics. You can get it from Record Shop X / Levykauppa Äx, so support DIY music and indulge yourself with some quality handcrafted Finnish prog while doing so!

“Endworld Halos” by Endworld Halos is available to order from Bandcamp.

CHINE_PROMO_2018_FINAL

Review: Chine – Like Vultures

Chine is a Swedish progressive death metal band with elements borrowed from Swedish death metal and progressive metal. They are about to launch their new EP entitled “Like Vultures” on March 2nd. Both musically, and lyrically “Like Vultures” has its dark side but never forgets to be melodic from the beginning to the end.

CHINE - Like Vultures

Singer Tintin Andersen has a great voice especially when it comes to clean vocals. A thick voice, ready to sing any kind of high pitched parts in a song. Which brings the release its power. Passages between growl and clean vocals are very well designed and executed. And more importantly they sound very tasty.

There are four tracks on the EP. Another highlight here are great and imaginative guitar solos. They are carrying the songs on a closer level to progressive metal and display the band’s influences, which range from old Opeth, Between The Buried And Me and Dark Tranquility.

It is hard to say that Chine bring something new to the scene, but without hesitation it can be said they brought a tasteful release, very well composed and executed. It highly satisfies the expectations from a listener.

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Acidiun

Album Review: Acidiun – The Coalescence

I was admittedly late to the Acidiun party, and it was by my own design. I found that the band’s overall sound is right in my wheel house of technical, tight, and aggressive deathcore. Upon the first listen I was sold, and I immediately devoured “The Coalescence” again. I was greeted by a band that seemed content making their own rules, traversing the slippery slope of sub genre alphabet soup and doing it with style. At times mind-numbingly complex, and at others focused on speed and aggression, they made metal that is forward thinking and diverse, while still being unapologetically heavy.

Acidiun - The Coalescence

The more I listened to this record, the more I enjoyed the sounds coming out of it. Make no mistake, the record is a slab of crushing deathcore/metalcore. Impeccably played and impeccably produced, it comes off as another notch on the rich scene. Sonically, the record is tight, fast and heavy with crunchy guitars that have heft and an overall crispness to the sound that allows the instruments to shine. The riffs are heavy, there are odd time bridges, feel changes and tasty leads that fly by in abundance. In short all of the boxes are checked.

Although nominally not a prog band, these guys are talented enough to do whatever they want. They have seemingly found a formula that is working for them for the time being, and only time will show where and how they deviate from it. I will be very curious to hear where they go with the next record, and whether or not they will stay this course they embarked upon.

So at the end of the day, “The Coalescence” is a solid outing from Acidiun. As a fan of metal, I can appreciate what they have done here. I just hope that more of that original mentality creeps its way into their next release.

Stay tuned with Acidiun via their Facebook page.

Diagoras

Review: Diagoras – Enigma

Progressive death metal is a genre that can be quite difficult to appreciate at times. It took me some time to get my head around some of its intricacies. I would now consider it to be one of my favourite sub-genres. Enter Diagoras, one such band hailing from Sweden, who have been active for over a year. Back in October last year they launched their debut EP titled “Enigma.” Straight off the bat it is clear that Diagoras have a bit more to them than some of the more generic progressive death metal bands around.

Diagoras - Enigma

The music is essentially a riff soup that is continually stopping, starting and changing tempo. There aren’t any direct comparisons to be made to other bands though there are plenty of influences including Hate Eternal, Immolation, Between the Buried and Me and Meshuggah. The sheer intensity of this release is something to behold. It has all the characteristics of a band that have been playing and recording together for years, although this is their first release ever. It is a credit to their musicianship and provides a glimpse and a hint towards what they may be able to achieve in the future.

Not only is “Enigma” extremely heavy, it is ultra technical also. There isn’t a moment where the entire band are resting on their laurels. While the guitars are shredding away, drummer is putting in one of the most spirited performances I have heard for some time. Though he isn’t the fastest drummer I have ever heard his choice of beats and fills is really interesting and creative. When it comes to production, everything is audible and certainly doesn’t lack the bite and the punch that would push the sound to the next level.

“Enigma” is out now and is available from Bandcamp.

Dreamsense_band

Interview: DREAMSENSE

After debuting with a cover of Nightwish’s “Slaying the Dreamer,” Russian symphonic metal band Dreamsense have just released a new single — “Glasswall.” The single is taken from the band’s upcoming album which is due in the first months of 2019.

We spoke with guitarist Ilya Dykin and singer George Ognev.

Hello! Thanks for responding to this interview. How have you guys been lately?

Ilya Dykin (guitars): We’ve been really busy with recording of our debut album, I really hope we will finish it soon!

George Ognev (vocals): Almost all the free time we spend in the process of recording the album. It remains a little bit and soon we will be able to present it.

How might you introduce yourselves to new potential listeners?

Ilya Dykin (guitars): Solid metal carcass, wrapped in orchestral arrangement

What inspired the name of the band — Dreamsense?

George Ognev (vocals): Every person during his life has feelings through which he perceives the world around. And dreams, the embodiment of which he seeks. Dreamsense is when feelings and dreams come together and you can feel your dreams.

How did Dreamsense initially form as a creative unit?

George Ognev (vocals): Many things led to this. If in short – the life of each of us has determined our tastes and the direction in which each of us wants to move. In the band it was decided from the very beginning not to drive oneself into frames and format. Everyone does what he love and we do it together.

Dreamsense

You have just launched a new single. Where did the inspiration for “Glasswall” come from and how did you go about the whole process of writing and recording it?

George Ognev (vocals): This song appeared as a cry of the soul. Naturally, the history of its creation based on personal experience, the pain of disappointment and the understanding that if you do not change anything, you can forever get stuck in despair. If there’s a wall on your way – you have to move and destroy it. Even if it hurts.

Originally the song was just a stream of thoughts in notes on the phone. But when Ilya sent the main guitar riff (4 of its stroke) immediately it became clear that all of the text in the notes starts to turn into lyrics. Line by line they were formed, guided by the melody. And the song was born. It’s not difficult to write a song – it’s much more difficult to record it in the Studio. But apparently we did it :)

What can listeners expect from “Glasswall” and Dreamsense in general?

George Ognev (vocals): Pure and undisguised emotions. In general, all our material – frank and honest stories from our lives. I think many listeners will be able to find something close and dear to themselves in our songs.

What’s your songwriting process like?

George Ognev (vocals): It’s very unpredictable, actually. This process is always different. Sometimes a melody appears and then lyrics, sometimes Vice versa. Most often (as with “Glasswall”), Ilya send a guitar riff and I write lyrics, or I already have lyrics and put them into the riff.

Ilya Dykin (guitars): I send musical ideas to George (our vocalist) and after that we choose the best of them and turn them into songs.

What are your ultimate hopes for Dreamsense? Do you have any bigger plans for the future?

George Ognev (vocals): Our plans: not to stop and create further! To write music, make videos and delight our listeners. Play live shows.

As for the biggest hopes, and these are dreams – to play seven days sold out shows at Wembley Stadium, thus completing the tour, during which we will play in every corner of our planet :)

The last words are yours.

George Ognev (vocals): Don’s stop dreaming! And listen to Dreamsense.

“Glasswall” is available now from iTunes.

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Wroht_band

Review: Wroht – Worship Rot

With their debut album, Bay Area death metal quintet Wroht are only going to reach new heights for themselves and garner an ever-growing fan base due to the quality of this debut.

news-wroht-worshiprot

What stuns you upon a first listening of “Worship Rot is Wroht‘s great maturity in structuring a song, considering that this is their first full-length. In a year where we saw and are about to see tons of great death metal releases, these Americans have added a great value to the genre, all while keeping the flag flying high. Word of warning though as this is not for everybody and the weak. Only those who can withstand brutal, uncompromising, chaotic, and destructive and a horrific extreme metal need apply.

Across the record’s twelve tracks, Wroht show what they’re capable with controlled chaotic force and malignant intention. It’s cavernous, monstrous, claustrophobic, and downright nasty. Mixing together groove metal with straight-up death metal, while adding elements of crushing doom here and there, this is music that’s not for the unwary. Steeped in the aesthetics of black metal’s corrupted skin, while having a certain atonal death metal power, Wroht merge these two styles together seamlessly. The grim doom elements here are comparatively less-used, but enhance the music when they appear with further levels of darkness.

Grab “Worship Rot from Bandcamp here. For more info about Wroht you can follow them on Facebook.

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