Kuhnspiracy

Album Review: Kuhn Fu – Kuhnspiracy

Kuhnspiracy resonates on a number of levels. In the most obvious sense, it’s a testament to the skill, imagination, and resourcefulness of guitarist Christian Achim Kühn, an artist who operates with a profound depth of understanding in both formal and creative realms. But it’s also a link to the relationship that Kühn formed with Esat Ekincioglu on double bass, Lav Kovac on drums and Ziv Taubenfeld on clarinet.

Kuhnspiracy shows that a fruitful relationship was formed from that initial connection. With this second album by the group, Kühn gives other instruments the attention they so richly deserve. At different times he coaxes tuneful lines, deep grooves, upbeat notions, and plaintive strains from his guitar, inviting the bass’s woody weight and wisdom to the fore. He taps into a jazz rock with “Barry Lyndon” and “Deus Ex Machina,” brings avant-garde breeziness in “Signore Django Cabolo” and “Mono Industrial Post Depression.

Kühn proves to be a dynamic presence and a masterful arranger throughout, Taubenfend‘s instrument’s sound rings clear and true at every turn, and there’s nary a lull in activity or creativity across these eight tunes. Kuhnspiracy hits all the right marks and holds attention from beginning to end.