Category Archives: Interviews

PuzzleWood

Interview with PUZZLEWOOD

PuzzleWood from Moscow are a three-piece who back in November released their full-length debut “Gates of Loki.” The band classifies their work as “post-prog,” and I believe that it really is a fitting genre tag for what you can find on the album.

Guitarist and singer Anton Legatov spoke for Progstravaganza about the album.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Could be better, could be worse, much worse actually. So I’m fine.

What can people expect from “Gates of Loki”?

They can expect something unusual. Something they are unaccostomed to. I perfectly understand, that every musician says things like that about his project, but in this case it is the objective truth…At least I think so. Gates of Loki is not the album, that is easy to understand. It is necessary to dive into it, spend your time and pay some attention. But I’m sure, that the result will be satisfying for an attentive listener.

Gates of Loki
What was it like working on the album?

As usual – local branch of Hell of Earth. Writing an album is hard, recording it — much harder. Especially considering the conditions we had during our work. Though, it is pleasant, that from such a disorganised and greviously senseless chaos, something interesting was born.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Gates of Loki”?

Presently there are no such plans, because we don’t have people ready to organise such tour. If someone appears, we’ll gladly go on tour even to the Antarctic. We like giving live shows very much.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

All of them. I sincerely believe, that the musician’s core is to be a traveller, a bard. To wander around the world and play his music and sing his songs. This is what I consider the destiny of those, who chooses the Music to be his craft. Whether we are invited to Europe, USA, Canada or Japan – it doesn’t really matter. We’ll gladly perform anywhere and it’ll be a great honor for us.

Who and what inspires you the most?

Everything. I always say, that we don’t write the music. The Music writes itself and we are doing our best to deliver it the way we percieve its desire to exist. That is why it’s not for us to decide when it comes to us willing to be written.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

It may seem surprising, but I almost don’t listen Prog or Post-Prog. And in general I don’t listen to Rock music much. Often people compare us with Purcupine Tree or TOOL, but I must confess, I haven’t listened to any track of those two bands. Even now. I was on the concert of Steven Wilson once, but he was playing the material from his new album at that time, not the Purcupine’s. I have a lot of different music in my playlist, but mostly I’m old-fashioned. Very rarely I listen to music, written after the 1995. I listen to a lot of ethnic music, lots of jazz, blues of late 70s and middle of 80s. And, of course, the academic music. It is a must.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Thanks for your interest and attention to what we do. It is very good to know that politics and international issues don’t create prejudice and barriers for the art and love to music.

“Gates of Loki” is out now; order it from Bandcamp. Follow PuzzleWood on Facebook.

The Seathmaw Project

Interview with THE SEATHMAW PROJECT

The Seathmaw Project is Geovanni Munoz, an one-man melodic death metal band from Dallas. In December, he released his third studio album “Inexistence,” and he spoke for Progstravaganza about it, his influences, and other genres.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life is good, it can always be better but it’s good.

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Inexistence”?

For the longtime listeners it’s more of the same just more refined, balanced, and sharp.  For the new listeners they can expect a bit of an unorthodox approach to metal.  Typically you get a band that gives you one genre or sub-genre and that’s it, there’s a handful of bands that blend a couple of styles every now and then. Then there’s The Seathmaw Project,  you get a lot of different sub-genres thrown at you and there’s no telling what’s coming next.  The song can start like a thrash metal song and you think it’s going to remain that way but it can merge into a break-beat style, then slap you in the face with some black metal and before you know it you’re leaving the song with a stoner rock style.  It’s bananas!

The Seathmaw Project - Inexistence

What was it like working on the album?

It’s pretty chill, this album kinda just wrote itself.  Since I have full control of everything the only person I have to argue with is myself,  and that leads nowhere so its a simple process.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Inexistence”?

That’s the dream, unfortunately not the reality at the moment, the drawback to being the sole creator of the music is there’s no one around to take the music from the studio to the stage.  The live band would ideally be a five piece, maybe one day.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

With my previous band Inbryo we toured across the US, and that was fun but that was our backyard. I would love to tour Norway just cause of the amazing metal that has come from there.  Italy would be cool too, and a lot of the sales from my albums seem to come from France, so I’m thinking that be a cool experience to play to my fans in France.

Who and what inspires you the most?

James Hetfield inspires me and lets me know that metal never dies, dude is still cranking out the riffs like a mofo, that’s the coolest most inspiring person in metal today in my opinion.  What keeps me going is the future, what songs I will create, will I learn to sing? the unknown is a great inspiration.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Oh man, great question.  I listen to a wide range of music: Indie Rock, Pop, Pop Rock, Speed Metal, Thrash Metal, Death metal, Black Metal, Symphonic Metal, Goth Metal, Industrial, NuMetal, Melodic Death Metal, Hardcore, Hip-Hop, Traditional Mexican… I could go on for days, I think it’s important to listen to as many genres as you can handle, I’m a music head, I love music.  I think I draw from all of them for sure, a little bit of everything in the stew. My starting band was Metallica so Thrash Metal runs through my veins, I love speed more than anything in all of music, a good fast song regardless of style of music just gets me going.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Thank you guys for giving me a platform to speak on. To all new and old school fans that have been there from the beginning, thank you, good things are coming, these 3 albums are just the beginning.

“Inexistence” is available from Bandcamp.

Keigo Yoshida - The Blue Prison

Interview with THE BLUE PRISON

Keigo Yoshida, guitarist and composer, is a man behind the instrumental prog metal project The Blue Prison, who has his new EP “Alchemist” coming out on January 18th. In an interview for Progstravaganza, Yoshida tells us about his work.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Thank you for asking. Life is okay, working busy but still playing music. And all my family is good so I can’t complain.

Speaking of new music, you have an EP coming on January 18. What can people expect from “Alchemist”?

It is very aggressive EP but also melodious at same time. At least you won’t get bored for sure.

The Blue Prison - Alchemist

What was it like working on the album?

Not only this time but everytime I work on The Blue Prison’s records, it’s very challenging for me to searching for the sounds new and cool. It was very hectic this time as well but also it’s fun to create my own music always.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Alchemist”?

Unfortunately no, I need to have a band first. Hopefully I’ll find some people in the near future.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

If I could go on the tour, I’d love to visit Russia and Ukraine. And of course US. Those are the three counties actually many people supporting me since the begging. And I do really appreciate it.

Who and what inspires you the most?

That could be video games. Especially “Final Fantasy” and “Resident Evil” series.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

I listen to Jazz, Fusion, and Blues often. Especially Fusion is affecting to my play a lot I think. And I’m hoping to have more Blues taste mix to it in the future. Also I like EDM as well. It has so many things I can learn for my electronica side approach.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

This EP is might not be typical instrumental metal music for many people and has a lot of interesting approach I believe. I really hope everyone would enjoy listening “Alchemist”. And thank you for reading my interview.

For more about The Blue Prison follow the project on Facebook.

The Image You Claim

Interview with THE IMAGE YOU CLAIM

The Image You Claim is a newcoming progressive metalcore six-piece from California, and “Painted Visions” is their debut album released back in October last year.

Singer Justin Olsen looks back at the songwriting process of the album, touring, inspiration. Read the interview after the break.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life has been pretty alright, we have just been taking a well deserved hiatus for the holidays after our first batch of shows. We are back to the grindstone now, planning some new content as well as writing some new tracks.

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Painted Visions”?

Painted Visions is a really unique and emotional record. I feel like it really encapsulates our style but also gives us room for evolution.

What was it like working on the album?

It was quite an experience. It was my first time in the studio recording. It improved my vocals and warm up routines as well as giving me important insight on the whole process. Chris handled a lot of the mixing and mastering, but Julian and I played a part in revision and nitpicked the hell out of it until it was ready to ship. It was really fun writing, composing and recording and i look forward to doing it again soon.

The Image You Claim - Painted Visions

Are there any touring plans in support to “Painted Visions”?

You know, the band has been throwing around the idea of like, a west coast tour since the album released, but we have had a tough time finding prog bands in our area to tour with. Not only that, we have just been dialing in tone, getting things right, and making sure things are reliable as possible equipment wise. We have had some adventures with FOH sound, and we want to make sure everything is as straightforward and professional as possible, but if there are any progressive metal or djent bands in the SoCal area, hit us up!

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

It would be awesome to tour the US, the UK, and Australia in the future. The metal scene is growing day by day and i would love to have the opportunity to travel around and broaden our fanbase.

Who and what inspires you the most?

My biggest inspiration personally is Donovan Melero of Hail the Sun, and Sianvar. both he and Jordan Dreyer of La Dispute inform a lot of my writing. It helps me think of alternate ways to structure, metaphorize, and use a unique syntax to write songs, It really helps in progressive metal with all the crazy riffs and time signature changes. Donovan’s performance really made me reevaluate how i was using my voice, so tonally it could be  cleaner and less forced without losing that sort of emotion. I’m still working on all that though, and i have a lot of room for improvement haha.

Chris, our guitarist and writer of the instrumentals for Painted Visions, is inspired by bands like Periphery, Animals as Leaders, and suchlike, but i feel like he has a “voice” of his own. His style is super distinct.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

I listen to almost anything and everything (with the exception of country). I have to say it really does. Chris and I are studio-centric (I guess that’s what you would call it) and it helps inform sound design, technique and composition. You can hear in my writing that I listen to a lot of post-hardcore stuff, as well as math rock. I also listen to a lot of Jazz, Rap, Indie, Electronic, ect. All of our horizons are broad, and our minds open, so that helps immensely, both in terms of sound and knowledge.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

I would like to say that we really appreciate every single person that supports us. Listen and enjoy but also don’t be afraid to talk to us. Hit us up on social media, give us some input on our videos on how we could improve, or even just to tell us you enjoyed it. Thank you guys for giving us this opportunity.

Links:

Bandcamp

Facebook

Instagram

YouTube

Heyoka's Mirror

Interview: HEYOKA’s MIRROR

Heyoka’s Mirror is a progressive metal trio from Canada who has just released its debut EP “Loss of Contact with Reality.” Over the course of my time writing for this and other websites, I’ve come into many interesting and unique acts. I can certainly say that Heyoka’s Mirror are creating a very interesting progressive metal, which is often mixed with other different styles such as classic Power / Heavy Metal, Modern Metal and Opera.

The three dudes in Heyoka’s Mirror — Andrew Balboa, Omar Sultan and Bayan Sharafi — answered my questionnaire about the EP, touring, and more.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

HM: Life is good and life is cold right now. Today (Dec. 30th) is -27C but it feels -40C with the wind chill. So yeah… But life is great right now!

Speaking of new music, you have an EP. What can people expect from “Loss of Contact with Reality”?

Bayan: People can expect a musical adventure.

Andrew: We’ve had a few reviews from other magazines and everyone is getting pretty confused hahaha. People love it but they say they have never heard anything like this before. So….. expect something new.

Omar: Even if you don’t like heavy music or prog music.. try it! This will be a great introduction for you.

Heyoka's Mirror - Loss of Contact with Reality

What was it like working on the EP?

Andrew: It was fun! It took nine months to write the three songs, and recording took ten months. We all have full time jobs so, finding the time to write and record was a bit challenging. But the overall process was really fun!

Are there any touring plans in support to “Loss of Contact with Reality”?

Omar: We would like something short to start… Three or five cities, nothing big because our main focus right now is to record the full album.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

HM: Japan, Germany, Brazil, Russia and the States of course!

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Omar: Hard rock! I grew up listening to hard rock and that’s the reason why I started playing when I was 16. It made my playing very musical.

Bayan: Funk! A lot of 80’s and 90’s music like Tom Jones and The Bee Gees. And it has changed the way I feel groove.

Andrew: I listen to a lot of jazz, classical… everything! Even J-Pop! … Japanese pop is beautifully composed.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Omar: Get the EP, listen to it with headphones. find the time to really pay attention to it, give it a chance and you’ll love it!

Andrew: I think that you have to listen to it a few times, you can’t just listen to it once; if you do, you’ll think it’s just another “wanna be prog album”. Listen to it a few times and you’ll discover really interesting things.

Bayan: Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for cool and fun updates every Saturday!

HM: Thank you very much for interviewing us!

“Loss of Contact with Reality” is available as digital download and CD directly from the band, here.

Zombie Strippers from Hell

Interview with ZOMBIE STRIPPERS FROM HELL

Zombie Strippers From Hell is Dr. Satan and Mark Twain, and they are my new favorite band. You will probably think “how come that someone with such band name and pseudonyms can even be real or serious about music,” but the fact is that the duo makes some pretty dope music. Hear it yourself.

So, Dr. Satan and Mark Twain completed work on their debut album entitled “Tales From the OtherSide,” with drums recorded by Decapitated’s Michal Lysejko, and it was released on December 1st.

Doctor and Twain talked with me about the album, and more.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Everything is great, we have some holidays now so everyone have some time to spend with family, friends etc etc. nowadays lack of time can hurt our relationships so every free time we like to spend with our beloved.

Tales from the Other Side

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Tales from the Other Side”?

It’s our full-length debiut and it shows our musical diversity – we like mixing up some tunes and for us its really important to put every tune we like in our music with freedom of creation. So if You like all kinds of heavy music you will enjoy it.

What was it like working on the album?

It was great but very stressful time. We did all the preproduction stuff at our home DeepOne Studio in Pszczyna – so at the “real” studio (HugeStudio) we was prepared enough to make things nice and smoothly. Bartosz Góra (our engineer & producer & friend) knows us very well so we put all tracks very fast. Michal Lysejko is so talented and skillful drummer so working with Him was a pleasure and joy. The hardest way for us because we did everything by ourselves, was to create our sound – but we were challenging ourselves very hard so the mixing was the longest part and the most nervous. From one side we were like schoolboys in the new school with our music and our knowledge about whole process but from the other side we had strong consciousness about who we are and where we want to be. And Michal pushed us really hard but now You can hear the results – we are very happy with them.

Zombie Strippers From Hell

Are there any touring plans in support to “Tales from the Other Side”?

Now we’re in the middle of preparing new lineup cause we had some troubles in the past. We’re looking for talented guys to play with us and maybe in the near future You’ll see the Zombie Strippers from Hell live with new material.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

First of all, because we don’t have any contract and other commitments when the time will come we want to do some concerts in Poland. We have some good friends waiting for us, to see us live on the  stage. Then, who knows what will happen?

Who and what inspires you the most?

Lyrically Howard Philip Lovecraft and his work; horror b-movies and cult classic like Friday the 13th; Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Halloween… Musically everything from classic punk like Misfits; old school heavy metal (Iron Maiden, Helloween) to new modern classic like Slipknot, Killswitch Engage, Machine Head… We listen to very different music – both of us have some very opposite beloved bands but we’re open minded and that’s most important for us when we create our own music.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Yeah, Mark Twain listen a lot of Dream Theater and Mr. Petrucci has a real impact on him. And Disco from ’90s is a perfect fit for us when we’re dancing :)

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Yeah – read the Lovecraft, listen to Zombie Strippers from Hell and enjoy Your life!

Links:

Bandcamp

Facebook

Anubis

Interview with Robert James Moulding of ANUBIS

Sydney’s Anubis released their fourth studio album The Second Hand earlier this year. Lead vocalist Robert James Moulding speaks for Progstravaganza about his musical beginnings, working on the new album, Prog in Australia, and more.

Let’s start from your early music beginnings. How did your musical career begin? When did you start playing? Which groups have been your favorites as a young man? Please tell us something more about your early life.

I started playing music during the early years of high school – in friend’s garages! It was one of the only things that kept me interested during that period. My friends and I would skip the last class of the day so we could get in an extra hour of playing together. It was during that time I only ever listened to Punk music. NOFX, Bad Religion, Pennywise anything from the States I’d just eat up. I never really fitted in, I’d emigrated from the UK to Australia at a young age and whilst culturally it’s similar there was still a slight disconnect I felt, socially.

How did you go about forming Anubis? Who was the most influential when the band started its musical journey?

Dave who plays keys and I started the band whilst we worked at a pizza place together. A mutual friend of ours had passed away whilst holidaying in Canada and as a way of dealing with the grieving process we decided to write some songs and create a concept record. Dave was schooled in music all the way to a university level, I simply had my garage background but we managed to find a middle ground. By this time I had switch to the dark side and was heavily into prog but we had different approaches to creating music. I’d say Dave was the main driving musical force on the first record, he had far superior writing skills and theory knowledge.

Robert James Moulding

Robert James Moulding

In the beginning, did you have some “fixed” tempo in composing songs or everything was a product of jamming, improvising?

Dave, his brother Steve and I were the initial three members of the band. We decided to bring all of what we had written separately together in the room and play out what we had. During that time we would jam and improvise new bits and pieces. We were writing to a strict story and concept so it was like putting the right songs together with the right chapter of the story. It sounds harder then it is, in fact it can make it far easier.

How would you describe Anubis’ music on your own?

I would say it’s a conscious effort to create ‘progressive rock’ but with a slightly modern edge. We all love a lot of modern artists as well as the classics from the 70s and 80s. It makes it more interesting that way. There are a few acts today that attempt to write exclusively in the style of the classic prog bands, and emulate the whole sound, visuals, face makeup, but that’s not our thing at all.

Anubis - The Second Hand

Your new album, The Second Hand, is a follow-up to the critically acclaimed 2014 release Hitchhiking to Byzantium. Have you felt any pressure while working on The Second Hand because of that?

No, not at all. If there is pressure we like to use it in a positive manner. It can create a lot of fuel for your fire if you feel that your back is against the wall. If HTB was acclaimed by the critics it only encouraged to try harder.

What has changed for Anubis when it comes to writing new music — The Second Hand in particular?

The major difference with this record compared to the last is when we got back together to start none of us brought anything to the table. All we had was our instruments in front of us and a large blank canvas. The concept and story had come before the songs. did, it seems to be the way we write concept albums. Maybe one day we will reverse the process, who knows?

You label your music as cinematic progressive rock. What makes it “cinematic”? You pay attention to atmospheric and ambient elements. How important it is for the structure of your songs?

The ‘cinematic’ description came from the early days when we were showing people the material. It was the main thing that kept coming back to us. A lot of what we do benefits from a story and structure and we like to add cinematic-sounding elements – sound effects, atmospheres. It helps push the narrative along and create an atmosphere connected to the story. People have been doing it for years, it’s nothing that new.

How do you see the Australian progressive rock scene. There has been many, many great bands coming from Australia in the recent years. It seems that you guys love prog over there.

Well actually, it’s kind of the opposite. Prog is very much niche and underground over here in Australia. There isn’t a large audience for it and doesn’t get played by large radio stations. Even the indie stations find it a little embarrassing. The reason there maybe be an influx of artists coming over to Europe and America is that’s where most of our audiences live. It’s quite rich in talent and is growing but we find ourselves trying to find ways to grab the attention of people on the other side of the globe.

Do you guys consider yourselves a part of any specific cultural movement, however peripheral?

I don’t see the culture of music in Australia changing anytime soon. So probably not. I do feel the music industry does a lot to get involved in social and political matters. These are certainly things we feel quite strongly about and have no issue using our music to promote something positive socially or culturally. Like we did on The Second Hand.

Anubis

Are you also involved in any other projects or bands beside Anubis? I know that Douglas Skene is also in Hemina, another cool prog band.

Not at the moment. All my energy finds its way into Anubis in one way or another. It’s were I find I’m most driven towards artistically. I know for Doug Hemina was something different he felt he needed to express, it has the added advantage of including his wife Jess on bass too.

So, what comes next for Anubis?

2018 will see us return to Europe playing Night of the Prog festival in Loreley. We will be playing other shows dotted around the continent once it’s all finalised. Hopefully we have a surprise up our sleeve for our fans as well.

Order The Second Hand from Bandcamp. Keep in touch with Anubis via Facebook or Twitter.

The Mercy Stone

Interview with THE MERCY STONE

The Mercy Stone is a 12-piece ensemble that is breaking the boundaries between the worlds of rock, jazz, and classical music. Performing all original instrumental compositions, The Mercy Stone’s music possesses all the intricacies of a finely tuned contemporary-classical chamber ensemble and the energy of a high-octane rock band.

Back in September, the ensemble released their debut album titled “Ghettoblaster,” and we talked with guitarist, composer and the man behind The Mercy Stone, Scott Grady.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Thanks for asking. Things are great – feeling happy to talk about our music today!

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Ghettoblaster”?

This album fuses aspects of “classical” music composition with a rock-based aesthetic. I imagine that most of the people engaging with this album would be coming from a listening background that was largely rock/pop oriented with most of their “classical” music experience coming from background music in movies or television. On many tracks, I think that the surface elements of the music would quickly convey a good idea of where we are coming from artistically. My hope is that, without any sort of pretense, the raw elements of the music are compelling enough to draw listeners in for a deeper listen. There are elements in “classical” composition that most popular music doesn’t really deal with, generally. While it is not necessarily important to me that anyone hear the music and correctly identify the octave cannon with augmented rhythmic values (sorry to geek out there for moment), it’s fun to think that they might hear it and just feel the tremendous groove it creates.

Ghettoblaster

What was it like working on the album?

We started recording the album with only a few pieces composed from beginning to end. But once the recording process began, the rest of the material really started to flow. Each individual track and the album as a whole came together very organically in what I could jokingly call a very long drawn out stream of consciousness process. Even though the album was written and recorded over many months, there was still definitely an aspect of just excitedly and blindly seeing where the music would lead without an extremely specific plan.

We were fortunate to work with some very patient engineers/producers who helped immensely in getting the sound of the record into its final form. I think mixing was a big headache for all of us. The instrumentation of the group along with the subtleties of the arrangements presented some pretty daunting challenges in this regard. There were moments along the way where I would feel like the entire project was a failure because we just couldn’t get the mixes right. It’s hard to put into words how great it feels to be on the other side of that process with a finished record that you love.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Ghettoblaster”?

Absolutely. At the moment we are polishing the material from the album, along with some new music, for live performance and will start gigging regionally in southern California in the near future.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

I’m looking forward to taking The Mercy Stone to every corner of the globe where we can reach people with our music. The dream of being able to see the world as a touring musician versus simply a tourist is quite intoxicating.

Who and what inspires you the most?

Authenticity in any form is inspiring to me. Lloyd Rodgers was a composer and a composition professor of mine. He once took a written copy of a piece I was working on and threw it on the ground in disgust because he felt that I wasn’t writing music that was true to what he knew of my musical/artistic inclinations. He was enraged at this thought. Any student of Dr. Rodgers would not be the least surprised by this story. I’m still not sure that I agree with him completely in that instance. But, god, I loved that guy. He recently passed and I’m quite sad that I never got to share the music from this album with him. The piece, Conception, was directly inspired by my time studying counterpoint with him.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Being a lifelong musical omnivore, there is music from almost every genre I have encountered that has been influential and inspiring. Though this album primarily deals with the synthesis of rock and classical elements in an instrumental setting, I’m still a sucker for a great song. I’m way late in discovering the music of Elliot Smith. His music is just brilliant. There’s a lot of classic rock that has a special place in my heart. I just re-listened to Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon for the first time in about 5 years and it filled me as completely as the first time I heard it.

I’m also fortunate enough to have creative people in my life that are of great inspiration to me, musically. My bandmate, Emmanuel Ventura-Cruess, has a band called Emael. He is a cellist, singer, and songwriter who is making some of the coolest rock/pop music that I’ve heard in a while. His first album will be out soon and his music is just fantastic. While I was working on my master’s degree in composition, I met another student named Craig Michael Davis. When we met, he was just beginning to compose. He went on to study with the composer, Michael Gordon, in New York and is making some really beautiful post-minimal music. I think we have both taken great pleasure in being friends and watching each other develop as composers.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

It’s been a blast connecting with people who dig our music since we released the album a few months ago. I hope we can continue to excite and surprise our audience with each new musical endeavor.

Links:

Bandcamp

Facebook

Mosh Werner

Interview with MOSH

Israeli singer-songwriter Moshe Werner aka Mosh speaks for Progstravaganza about his recently released debut album “Unbreakable Wall.”

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life is good, working hard, happily married, not much to complain.

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Unbreakable Wall”?

“Unbreakable Wall” is a part of my identity, a way for me to communicate with others.

It’s a brief glance into my life’s journey, filled with a range of emotions.

What was it like working on the album?

It was an incredible experience that taught me a lot about myself, I learned to accept my own faults and be happy with what I present.
It was a long process that had many layers and often was irritating, but that what makes it so beautiful.

I cherish the moments I spent in the studio with Guy Levy, my producer.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Unbreakable Wall”?

That is the ultimate goal, it is my dream to tour all over the world, I’m definitely ready for touring.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

My biggest dream is to tour the United States. I’ve always dreamed about doing a coast to coast trip, and there’s no better way to do so!

With that being said, I’d love to tour whenever I can.

Who and what inspires you the most?

I’m mostly inspired by singers who compose or a part of a band. I search to connect through the lyrics and singer’s presentation.

There are some singers who influenced the way I write and make music, Shannon Hoon is a great example, as I feel his pain when he sings from his heart. I try to do the same.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

I used to be a DJ when I was in high school, I still enjoy that from time to time. I like a lot of genres, it’s not about the genre, it’s about if the song is good or bad to my ears. I can enjoy hip hop and jazz and many other genres, but I mostly prefer rock.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

I would like to thank everyone who has listened to the album, I wish that Unbreakable Wall can inspire people to express their emotions and create.

Life is all about creation.

TEAI

Interview with THE EARTH AND I

Prog Metal Newyorkers, The Earth and I, dropped their debut full-length effort “The Candleman” on 3rd of November, a release that displays talent of this young five-piece.

The group is ready to put out their sophomore album titled “The Curtain” in early 2018.

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life is great, thanks for asking. Between the 5 of us, we have a collective age of 476 years, but we’re feeling fresher than an Andes mint after a tubful of savory Olive Garden grub.

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “The Candleman”?

That’s right. The Candleman is a bit of a smorgasbord. Progressive metal gluttons should find enough long epics and guitar noodles to satiate their hunger. But we hope that every listener can find a morsel or two that piques their fancy.

What was it like working on the album?

The Candleman was a lesson in patience and perseverance. This record features significantly higher production quality than can be found on any of our past project’s releases. In that sense, The Candleman is very much the first album any of us have put out that is able to properly communicate our artistic intent. In the four years and change that it took to make this music, we gained a ton of experience in songwriting, recording, and the production process. We truly cut our teeth on this record, and we hope listeners will appreciate the labor.

The Candleman

Are there any touring plans in support to “The Candleman”?

We can’t say just yet, though we always like to keep ourselves occupied with a consistent stream of local shows. For now, we have a ton of exciting video content planned, as well as an early 2018 release for The Candleman’s companion record, The Curtain, which we wrote and recorded at the same time.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

Any country in Europe would be awesome, but we would particularly like to play the UK. A number of the revered titans of our genre—Tesseract, Sikth, and Monuments to name a few—hail from the UK, so we’d love to check out the scene for ourselves.

Also, definitely Japan. There seems to be a market for noodly guitar bands, but I’m not sure we’d make the cut. Right now, we’re just the instant cup ramen of prog. Gotta step up our noodle game. We’re aiming for udon, but we’ll settle for soba.

Who and what inspires you the most?

I think we continue to be inspired by music’s ability to affect us on a profoundly personal level. Though it becomes rarer as our music libraries expand, we still have those occasional ‘holy shit’ moments when we find something truly novel.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Jazz. Tigran Hamasyan’s music was a gateway for many of us. The world of jazz is a mile wide, and just as deep. There’s so much we can learn from its sense of modal harmony and unique chord voicings, as well as a wider dynamic range than you typically hear in metal. Also, we’ve noticed the chromaticism of video game music start to creep into new riffs. Expect LP3 to feature nothing but 8-bit jazz standards.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Alright, I don’t have much time. It’s risky, but I gotta level with you. I’m not even in this band. They got me trapped in a cellar, answering their emails while they bring me mashed potatoes by the bucket. The one they call Meerkat always has this ravenous grin. I think they’re fattening me up. Man, they’re freaking cannibbbbbbbbbbbbbbnm,.;’

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