Tag Archives: death metal

Lelahell

Death Metallers LELAHELL Run Indiegogo Campaign

Alif is the title of the second studio album by Algerian death metal trio Lelahell, for which the band recently launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. The campaign is active for three weeks; you can head to the campaign’s page and support the band in reaching the goal what will allow them to raise the funds for the album artwork, album’s production, production of a music video and a band merchandise.

The founder of the band, singer and guitarist Redouane Aouameur commented: “Our campaign is running since 5 weeks and will end in 3 weeks. We expect to get at least 50% of the requested amount this will help us to have a very good quality record mixed and mastered in the Hertz Studio, the sound that will perfectly feet to this album.”

The title of the album is inspired by the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. In Arabic, alif is the first letter in the alphabet, and it is used in Arabic calligraphy to determine the size of the following characters. Lelahell say they chose the title as this album “will be the main musical reference of the next upcoming releases.”

The trio’s new album, Alif, is slated as the group’s second full-length album and third release since the band’s formation in 2010. Lelahell are set to record at Hertz Studio in Poland under the guidance of well-known producers — the Wiesławscy brothers.

Support Lelahell by donating through the Indiegogo campaign, and follow them on Facebook for future updates.

About Lelahell:

Founded in 2010 by metal veteran Redouane AouameurLelahell is an Algerian death metal band hailing from Algiers. The trio comprises of Redouane “Lelahel” Aouameur (guitars, vocals), Ramzy Curse (bass) and Slaveblaster (drums). Lelahell have released one EP, Al Intizar (Goressimo Records, 2012), and one full alubum, Al Insane… The (Re)birth of Abderrahmane (HPGDP, 2014). The band also launched a documentary in 2016 titled Highway to Lelahell – An Algerian Metal Documentary, available for streaming on YouTube, presenting viewers with a solid history lesson on Algeria’s metal scene. The band have also embarked on three European tours, and also participated in festivals in Europe.

Kardashev

Interview with Kardashev

Progressive death metallers from Tempe in Arizona, Kardashev released their new album titled “Peripety” in 2015. The release received strong feedback from fans. I asked couple of questions about the album, scene, influences, gear, and more.

Hey guys. How are you doing?

We’re doing great! We actually got some rain in Arizona today, so we’re feeling pretty lively.

You released “Peripety” back in October. How do you feel about the release?

We feel pretty positively about the release, and the album itself. While we were writing it we were fairly certain it would be well received, and so far It has exceeded our expectations. Our fans have sent us some of the nicest messages and pieces of feedback. It’s really motivating! We’ve been shipping it out to more countries, chatting with people in places we’ve never been, and even found a few new friends to play games with online. The album release has really opened up some doors for us, as far as connecting with our fans. It’s been awesome, to say the least.

Peripety

How much of a challenge was it to work on the album?

It was hard. The writing process is always so wonderful, and for us it flowed really well. We all really connected in that regard. The tough parts came with all the parts of creating an album that don’t involve writing. There was so much planning for marketing the album, getting it to the right people for previews and reviews, setting a release date that wouldn’t conflict with other bands on Subliminal Groove Records, it was insane. These are all great opportunities and we’re thankful for them of course, it just gets very taxing. It’s true though, nothing worth doing is easy. We’ve really grown as a band and in our understanding of what it means to write music for an album, and so in the end it has been a positive experience.

How is the metal scene these days in Tempe, AZ?

The metal scene here is odd, to say the least. Its full of great bands and great people, but we’re a little short on venues. The venues that we have a great, don’t misunderstand us – but a lot have shut down over the years and as a result metal is a little less accessible. Our Bassist was out of the country from the time we played at UK Tech Metal Fest in July, all the way through The end of November – and so admittedly we’re a bit removed since we haven’t played a show in quite some time. We’re excited to get back into the scene because we’ve made some solid friends here. But AZ could definitely use some additional venues.

What is your opinion about the new wave of metal bands?

That’s quite a large group! The best answer is that there are some bands that we really enjoy, and others that don’t strike our fancy as much. We aren’t very good at keeping up with the newest bands just because there are so many. Music is a Beautiful thing and we’re glad that so many people want to make it. As long as most of these bands are writing honestly, and from their hearts, they have our support.

Can you tell me something about your influences?

We take a lot of influence from very simple things, such as landscapes and art that is done in a more minimalist style. Peripety is all about the ideas of letting go, accepting the beauty around you, and the idea that all of this is temporary. Those concepts took us back to nature, in that it is such a simple pleasure which is completely free. We tried to convey landscapes in the album art, the music videos, and even in the composition. Songs like Sopor and Lucido were written with the idea of clouds and large, empty spaces in mind.

Kardashev

What are you listening to these days?

There has been a lot of Atmospheric Black Metal playing. Bands like Mesarthim, Enisum, Selvans, and Lantlos all get a lot of playtime with us. There are the classics, which for us are The Contortionist, Aegaeon, and some Fallujah. We also listen to a lot of movie soundtracks, such as Interstellar and The Fountain. The score for Phantom of the Opera is breathtaking, and there are some very heart-wrenching songs in Les Miserables that we love. We really enjoy the more meditative side of electronic music, such as Shpongle, Emancipator, and Bvdub. We throw some Alt-J on from time to time, along with S. Carey and Jose Gonzalez.

Your five favourite records of all time?

Only five? There are three of us! we’ll have to do a few extra. In no particular order,

1. Melting Sun – Lantlos
2. Brother, Sister – mewithoutYou
3. Exoplanet – The Contortionist
4. Retold – Nest
5. Opus at the end of everything – The Flashbulb
6. Lateralus – Tool
7. L.D. 50 – Mudvayne

Can you tell me a little bit more about the gear you used to record “Peripety”?

We’ve been recording our own music since we started. Lots of musicians do these days, and it has always worked out well for us. All of the guitars are recorded using the Axe FX Ultra for guitar tones. We made the most use of it this time around after updating the tones for more bark or “djenty” sounds when needed. All of the songs were recorded using custom RC pickups, which helped us get the overall feel we were going for. Bass guitar was tracked on a Warwick Thumb BO 5 as line signal and then re-amped at Sound Lair with an Ampeg SVT-3 Pro and Ampeg 4×10 HLF cabinet. We try to record the best quality we can, incur as little cost as possible, and aim for simplicity. Here’s an overall gear list for the nerds among us.

Recording/Composition:
Reaper DAW
Reason DAW
EZ Drummer
Interface:
M-Audio Fast Track Pro
Guitars:
Fractal Axe Fx Ultra
Ibanez RG7321 with RC Intruder Pickups
Dunlop Jazz III Picks
Elixir Nanoweb strings
Monster Cables
Bass:
Warwick Thumb BO 5
Monster cables
Ampeg SVT-3 Pro and Ampeg 4×10 HLF cabinet
Vocals:
Shure SM7b for vocal tracking

Besides the release of the album, are there any other plans for the future?

We are already writing new material that build on the single we released before “Peripety”, called “IOTA”. We want to put out a couple of music videos, and maybe re-release our demo, “Progession”. We haven’t decided on that last idea, yet.

Any words for the potential new fans?

If you like our music, show it to your friends! We’re very honored to have your support!

“Peripety” by Kardashev is out now and you can get it from Bandcamp.  For more news from Kardashev follow the band on Facebook and Twitter.

Jeff Carter

Interview: Jeff Carter of Darkening

I have previously wrote about Darkening‘s debut album “Augür” here, and I felt that it was necessary to conduct an interview with the band’s mastermind Jeff Carter and find out what lies behind the music he brought into life through this release.

Jeff was kind enough to answer my questions in the interview below.

Alright, first things first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life is going pretty well, actually. With the release of the album, I seem to finally have free time here and there to do other hobbies besides music.

Speaking of new music, you recently released an album. Are you satisfied with the reception you received for “Augür” so far?

Yes, so far, the reception has been quite great. There are a few music entities interested in hearing where I take things next, being as this was kind of a surprise album for older fans of mine – they are excited as well. Kind of a different musical approach than people are used to hearing from my earlier compositions, which incorporated input from other musicians (Deus Invictus, The Chariot, were some earlier work of mine).

Darkening - Augür

What is “Augür” about?

On a personal level, Augur is about many things…some of which I will not get into…but to basically graze the surface – nightmares, omens, and how they correspond to real life situations and events. I sought to capture the essence of what it is like or might be like right before something tragic happens directly to oneself, predominantly the feeling that you know deep down, via sickening feeling, that you or someone else has a cursed existence for the next few minutes. There are many stories that sort of link together a tragedy, or string of tragedies. Some subjects include a religious person seeking death after being misled by a wolf in sheep’s clothing, a girl who grows up in a government facility who finds out she has special telekinesis after the tests and unleashes the power on all humanity, and finally a person who is possessed with a spirit which makes him a werewolf, among other subjects. All stories are partially inspired by my love for horror movies, but interlaced with the fact that some things aren’t explained, and some things that happen in life can be quite creepy and unsettling. Darkening is the band that specializes on bringing that fear to music. The term “Augur” itself means “interpreter of omens”.

Jeff Carter
Are there any touring plans?

Not in the immediate future, being as we are a studio band. Of course as coverage, exposure, and fan base increases…so would our desire to support it with a live show.

While we’re on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

I would really love to get out to the UK, Germany, Sweden….to name a few…

Who and what inspires you the most?

Mysticism, nature, heavy metal bands of the 70′s. Myself and the studio players on this album included, do not really like very many “newer” metal bands….we grew up on the 90′s death metal scene and kind of skipped back to old Black Sabbath. Of course music inspires us, inspires me…so I really won’t go into too much without sounding like just another musician in an interview…haha. Obviously my family goes a long way towards my inspirations. Lastly, Darkening is mostly inspired by pioneers in art and music…and by the fans.

What other genres of music do you listen to?

Lots of electronica (progressive house….I guess because it’s “prog”). Um….anything from jazz to reggae to 80′s pop. Anything can be entertaining if played with precision and done well. I am a huge fan of The Police, in fact, that is where a lot of my drumming influence comes from. And of course: Motorhead.

Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

Huge Stewart Copeland (The Police) fan. I grew up listening to his drumming in the weird reggae time signatures, which kind of opened up the door for me as a kid to listen to bands like Rush, Yes, and Blue Oyster Cult. I learned to play “blast beats” when I was 12 years old after getting pretty hyped up hearing a Cannibal Corpse album I bought at the record store. Took a while, but after jamming with high school friends and acquaintances for years, I tried to step up my game on drums to a “professional” level – trying to make as few mistakes as possible. After all, if it wouldn’t sound good on an album…why bother playing? Perfection was key. With guitars, bass, and singing on albums…mainly got the practice in on other peoples’ guitars…and singing in my car when I was younger. It took years before I tried to test my vocals out in front of people. Also a pretty big fan of Opeth and some of the other Scandinavian bands out there.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you’d like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

Just would like to say thank you to the fans for their support, thank you to Annie and all at Prog Sphere for what they do, and thanks to Progstravaganza for the superb interview. You all are great! Happy Holidays from the Darkening camp!

You can buy “Augür” from Bandcamp here, and follow Darkening on Facebook.

Jeff Carter

Review: Darkening – Augür

Atlanta based death/black metal band, Darkening is a project of composer, producer and drummer Jeff Carter. Darkening is one of those bands who know very well how to merge “soft” elements with dark music without killing its meaning with melodic death metal influences and ambient guitars accompanied with growls.

Darkening recently released their debut album titled “Augür.” The record feels like a medium that hides the feeling of loneliness in its forsaken sound. Not only the music, but also lyrics and artwork help to feel the darkness. Simply it can be told that the name of the band feels right.

Augür

There are nine tracks in total on “Augür.” It kicks off with a nice instrumental intro. In some parts of the album vocals are done in a death metal way, but drumming is more characteristic for the black metal genre.

“Augur” is not just a raw album. It also has its emotional side. This album perhaps summarises a part of one’s life. That is why I found it different and gave this album a spin. Check out this record if you are looking for a release that is aggressive, dark but also emotional.

Buy “Augür” from Bandcamp here. Follow Darkening on Facebook.