Tag Archives: folk rock

Choral Hearse

Review: Choral Hearse – Mire Exhumed

Though it may seem rather reductionist to liken a band to the influences that spawned the realization of their sound, it’s nonetheless a useful tool for painting something as obtuse as words over the immaterial substance we call music. After all, everything accomplished in the world of music up to this point has been driven by the desire to blend influence with new ideas. Sometimes these individual influences are obfuscated through divergent aesthetics, but more often than not an artist’s inspiration is rather apparent if we understand the history of their sonic genetics. In the case of Choral Hearse, that influence is clear as day: a fresh mix of abstracted, Chelsea Wolfe-sque songwriting swathed with the dense, claustrophobic soundscapes that pertain to this discordant brand of doom metal. Choral Hearse may be wearing their influences on their proverbial sleeves here, but it feels almost sinful to reduce them to such skeletal stylistic comparisons; Choral Hearse deserves far more credit than that. After all, it’s one thing to borrow influence and in turn admirably pay homage to predecessors, but to create something that genuinely lives up to its inspirations in terms of quality and innovation is another thing entirely.

Mire Exhumed

“Mire Exhumed” is a deep album. It’s deep in the scope of its ambition, and it’s deep in the sheer amount of subtle richness that becomes revealed through numerous dedicated listens. What may initially appear as a relentless, angular exercise in needless technicality soon becomes a rich and naturally flowing tapestry of sound, rife with nuanced, puzzle-like builds that fall into cathartic and thought provoking releases of intricate groove. The brilliance really lies in the subtle dynamics here, with the interplay between instruments serving as the essential breeding ground for this album’s real “wow” moments. As a result, “Mire Exhumed” rewards attentiveness and — save for the few spacious grooves — repels casual absorption.

Choral Hearse really are masters (actually mistresses) of their discipline, especially for such a young band. The instrumentation borders on savant, but regardless of each members’ experience on their individual tools, to see a band play so tightly together on a debut album is truly impressive. This quality is only bolstered by the fine tuned production. The drums are roomy and organic, offering a graciously varied foundation for the rest of the band to work with. On top of these rhythms, the guitars glisten with a bright richness, leaving plenty of room for the taught bass to flex its brazen grit. Overall, the palette of sound here is overflowing with naturally dynamic textures channeled through chromatic songwriting that never reduces itself to theatrical nonsense.

Turbid as it may be, “Mire Exhumed” moves with a clear intent from start to finish. As the album progresses, the songs become more climactic in shape and atmosphere as the more splendid moments of melodic catharsis become increasingly developed.

“Mire Exhumed” is a fully-realized, devilishly-detailed album whose rich intricacies and nuanced genius will forever cement it as a timeless work of forward thinking doom metal. Fans of the progressive and deviant side of the genre shouldn’t have any trouble holding this album in the high esteem of the style’s most lauded releases. Indeed, “Mire Exhumed” is a brilliantly mature release overflowing with cerebral complexity executed to full potential. With their debut album, Choral Hearse have offered us a breathtaking, fully-realized album whose rich intricacies will keep you coming back for more long after think you’ve become acquainted with the depth of its knowledge.

“Mire Exhumed” is out on April 16; pre-order it on Bandcamp.

Unbreakable Wall

Review: Mosh – Unbreakable Wall

Unbreakable Wall, a debut album from Israeli singer-songwriter Mosh Werner aka MOSH, arrives like some horseman from the dusty past. His news is blunt, if not apocalyptic, with warnings that the future promises. His chaps are stained with blood shed during the Civil War, and the trail he’s followed from then until now runs before melting into a road without end that winds back toward where our memories began.

Werner lays all this out with help from some impressive players, toning down the fireworks and creating evocative settings through the most minimal gestures — a slow-motion guitar arpeggio, a keening fiddle, a note here or there to complement Mosh’s relaxed delivery. It’s significant, perhaps, that the album opens with “Keep on Moving,” a reminding ode to everyone that’s been stuck in place, and ends with “A Long Way from You,” which is both pessimistic and optimistic piece.

From music through message, Unbreakable Wall just about gets it right.

Links:

Bandcamp

Mosh Werner

Interview with MOSH

Israeli singer-songwriter Moshe Werner aka Mosh speaks for Progstravaganza about his recently released debut album “Unbreakable Wall.”

Alright, first thing is first. Before we dive into all the music stuff, how’s life?

Life is good, working hard, happily married, not much to complain.

Speaking of new music, you have an album. What can people expect from “Unbreakable Wall”?

“Unbreakable Wall” is a part of my identity, a way for me to communicate with others.

It’s a brief glance into my life’s journey, filled with a range of emotions.

What was it like working on the album?

It was an incredible experience that taught me a lot about myself, I learned to accept my own faults and be happy with what I present.
It was a long process that had many layers and often was irritating, but that what makes it so beautiful.

I cherish the moments I spent in the studio with Guy Levy, my producer.

Are there any touring plans in support to “Unbreakable Wall”?

That is the ultimate goal, it is my dream to tour all over the world, I’m definitely ready for touring.

While we are on the subject of touring, what countries would you love to tour?

My biggest dream is to tour the United States. I’ve always dreamed about doing a coast to coast trip, and there’s no better way to do so!

With that being said, I’d love to tour whenever I can.

Who and what inspires you the most?

I’m mostly inspired by singers who compose or a part of a band. I search to connect through the lyrics and singer’s presentation.

There are some singers who influenced the way I write and make music, Shannon Hoon is a great example, as I feel his pain when he sings from his heart. I try to do the same.

What other genres of music do you listen to? Have any of the other genres you listen to had any impact on your playing?

I used to be a DJ when I was in high school, I still enjoy that from time to time. I like a lot of genres, it’s not about the genre, it’s about if the song is good or bad to my ears. I can enjoy hip hop and jazz and many other genres, but I mostly prefer rock.

I really appreciate you giving us your time today. Is there anything else you would like to tell us and the fans before we wrap things up?

I would like to thank everyone who has listened to the album, I wish that Unbreakable Wall can inspire people to express their emotions and create.

Life is all about creation.