Tag Archives: Progstravaganza

Aisles on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Aisles

Aisles are a progressive rock band from Santiago, Chile. They have been considered one of the most interesting acts of recent years. So far they have released three albums, the widely acclaimed “The Yearning” (2005) and “In Sudden Walks” (2009), and “4:45AM”, which has been warmly received by the most prestigious publications of progressive rock.

Guitarist German Vergara answered the Progstravaganza Questionnaire after Aisles took part on Progstravaganza XIX: Convergence as a part of Prog Sphere Showcase feature.

How did you come to do what you do?

I remember as a kid seriously deciding I wanted to be a guitar player when I heard Bohemian Rhapsody’s guitar solo. I think that was the beginning of everything for me.

What is your first musical memory?

Probably my older brother playing the piano at our parents’ house, or even myself trying to get some sounds at the piano as a kid.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

I owe a lot to Jazz, Fusion, Prog Rock, World Music, New Age and Classical Music. There’s a Latin seal too in our music that we probably owe to South American music.

Some of my influences are: Yes, Pink Floyd, Rush, Genesis, Pat Metheny Group, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Jean Luc Ponty, Allan Holdsworth, Jean Michel Jarre, Pedro Aznar, Queen, Journey, Ryuichi Sakamoto, King Crimson, Iron Maiden, Led Zeppelin.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

Melancholia is perhaps the saddest song on the album. It talks about a child’s sickness and his mother’s suffering while she thinks about his destiny: Is he going to be happy or live a life in pain? That feeling of uncertainty is Melancholia, which can be a mortal illness. The whole song is sung from the son’s perspective as he sees his mother suffering. Can ‘Melancholia’ itself be the child’s sickness? We don’t know how sick this child is, but somehow his dreams have kept him alive so there’s hope for him in the future. It was a very emotive song to write and record. I remember being at the edge of tears at the studio while we were recording vocals.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

Not at all. Whatever flows, the method changes every time you want to write something.

What is your method of songwriting?

Most of the times an idea comes from improvisation on your instrument, in my case the guitar or sometimes the piano. Other times you have a pre-conceived idea of what you want and try consciously to get it on your instrument. That’s only the starting point, after that, the methods are countless. You can develop an idea as a band, as a small group of two or three, or by yourself and then arrange the composition as a band. We work in many ways. It would be unwise to have only one method.

How do you see your music evolving?

I think the band has reached a certain degree of maturity now, but that also means that you can never get stuck, you have to evolve. We always try our music to have a meaning and a reason, and with 4:45 AM we have succeeded at writing very emotive songs, which is our intention. I think our sound and music have become more authentic as the years have passed and we’ve developed a very original, theatrical and eclectic type of music.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

First of all, be brave about doing whatever you love in your life. You have the responsibility of following your dreams. Try to be authentic and spend many hours with you instrument. Don’t hear anybody when they say that you won’t be able to make a living as a musician, only you will put the limits to your dream.

Don’t think of fame and money, just do it for the sake of music, and success will come eventually.

What are you looking forward to?

We look forward to broadening our audience, reaching more people with our music and message. Also to be regarded as a truly original band with a unique sound. We intend to keep developing and evolving with this vehicle of artistic expression called Aisles.

Links:

Official website: http://www.aislesproject.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/aislesproject
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/aislesproject/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/aislesproject
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/aislesproject

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Sounds Like the End of the World on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Sounds Like the End of the World

Sounds Like The End Of The World is a five piece instrumental band which formed in 2012. In January of 2013 they recorded their debut promo mini album titled, “It All Starts Here” featuring 5 songs. The album was released in March of the same year. The band has performed live shows alongside God is An Astronaut, Long Distance Calling, Sleepmakeswaves, Tides from Nebula, Tune, Disperse, and Lebowski.

In February of 2014 the band’s first full length album, “Stages of Delusion” was recorded at Sounds Great Promotion Studio in Gdynia. Produced by Jan Galbas, mixed and mastered by Jakub Mankowski, known for his work with artists such as Behemoth, Obscure Sphinx, and Jordan Rudess from Dream Theater.

Read the Progstravaganza Questionnaire answered by Michał Baszuro.

How did you come to do what you do?

I grew up with parents both playing guitar. I always watched my mom doing it during parties with friends and It naturaly became my desire to play guitar.

What is your first musical memory?

It’s polish song called “Pieśń o zachodnich bankierach” by Andrzej Rosiewicz. I was less than 5 years old.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Emotions and everything that cause them. Music is emotion.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

That’s what I love in instrumental playing. There is no message, there is no vocalist that characterize band, there is no straight answer to that question. Everybody is free to feel or imagine everything they want while listening to our piece.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

Nope.

What is your method of songwriting?

Usually we do it with the whole band. Just jamming over some ideas till we reach this point where everybody feel that “This Is It”!

How do you see your music evolving?

I hope we will develop our sound, ideas and emotions we put in music. Everybody is evolving as a human beeing different way and everybody is experiencing life diffrently. We will see we where it bring us in the future.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

Do what you love to do and do it honestly – people will see that and
appreciate your work!

What are you looking forward to?

Can’t wait to share my emotions with people on my live shows. See you!

Links:

https://soundcloud.com/s-l-t-e-o-t-w/sets/stages-of-delusion-2014
https://www.facebook.com/SoundsLikeTheEndOfTheWorld

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Quiet! on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Progstravaganza Questinnaire: Quiet!

Quiet! is a psychedelic rock group based in Vancouver, WA. Formed by members of Fury III, Manta, and Thee Aristocrats. The band is inspired by but not limited to, 60′s American Garage Psych, 70′s English progressive rock and German Kosmische (as well as it’s direct descendant, Post Punk). For fans of Gabriel era Genesis, early Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, David Bowie, Amon Duul II and Wire.

The band recently appeared on Progstravaganza XIX: Convergence and guitarist Chris Read answered the Progstravaganza Questionnaire.

How did you come to do what you do?

Seeing Dave Gilmour in Live at Pompeii at the midnight movie as a kid. Seeing him play that superlative solo on Echoes a midst the ruins under the hot, Mediterranean sun did it!

What is your first musical memory?

I had a little wind up stuffed animal that played Brahms lullaby (sounded like a music box), which my mom also frequently sang to me.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Late 60′s/ 70′s work by English and German artists like Bowie, Pretty Things, Hawkwind, Caravan, Soft Machine, and Amon Duul II (and Wire from later in that decade). I love poetic language from Peter Gabriel (The Lamb!), Blake, Shelley and random corners of the Internet. I’m trying to compile a sort of template of some particularly resonant phrases for our next project which will have a bit of a Sci-Fi theme.

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

Florist is a call to reconnect w divinity or Source including, but not limited to it’s components like romantic love and what I call “completion”, when the male and female principles of the universe come together in harmonious perfection. The narrator in the song sees some of the same people each day through his/her shop window. As the seasons change, their daily lives run together like some type of time lapse video moving slowly in reverse, appearing as objects trapped in amber. He/she wonders what they dream about and if one’s own life can ever change for the better (moving closer to Source). Concurrently, Florist contains an almost Ray Davies like nostalgia for village life and time honored professions. The baker, the butcher, shop keeper, mechanic (black smith archetype) and policeman all make an appearance. These aren’t folks who make their money, impersonally on the Internet, play golf and yearn to get rich over night. I deeply love the Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and thought that it would be fun to set something epic and Jungian in LA (as a counter to Gabriel’s choice of NYC). I initially imagined a kind of Raymond Chandler take on The Lamb. Lotus Flowers ended up being set in “Anytown, USA” but I kept the line “Does the L.A River picture the sea” which I feel yearns very evocatively for Source, as does the closing line “Soon may the Distance forget our names.”

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

No, I work on inspiration, taking an emotional idea and trying to hang it on a structure that sounds fresh and interesting.

What is your method of songwriting?

Striving to make an emotion take form as a great musical theme.

How do you see your music evolving?

Today’s innovative abstractions are tomorrow’s conventions.. Amon Tobin has done some very musical things w sampled field recordings (as “played” on his Continuum Fingerboard). The downside of evolving technology would be a very generic output of cookie cutter grooves produced by non-musicians w looping software. An algorithm to me is not music, and looped “beats” are not songs. It’s fine for folks to play w software and express themselves, but maybe a bit more work goes into making something that has musical value and benefits society? As the technology advances and becomes more accessible, I hope for more innovators like Amon Tobin who are able to make creative abstractions within the current musical landscapes (ones which are creative enough to change it).

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

As hard as you can try, you’ll need to find a way to try 10 times harder!

What are you looking forward to?

Ecstatic musical and personal moments precipitated by delicious chemistry and a sense of adventure. Musically, I’m hoping to get close to the conceptual fire of the first Soft Machine album and to achieve the kind of interplay that Caravan had during their original lineup. We’d love to get over to do some shows in the EU and UK in the near future. Personally, I look forward to warm, languid afternoons framed by blue skies full of whimsically evocative clouds. I’m also looking forward to charmed evenings filled with sparkling conversation and intoxicants, perfectly lit by cinematic grade moon and starlight, tastefully scored by great musicians, night birds and singing insects.

Links:

https://quiettheband1.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/quiettheband

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Paul Bielatowicz on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: Paul Bielatowicz

Paul Bielatowicz is best known for his virtuoso guitar work with some of the biggest names in progressive rock. He’s played, recorded and toured with the likes of Carl Palmer (ELP), Neal Morse (Spock’s Beard, Transatlantic), Mike Portnoy (Dream Theater), Paul Gilbert (Mr. Big), Les Paul… to name just a few.

Paul took part on Progstravaganza XIX: Convergence, check the questionnaire below.

How did you come to do what you do?

At an early age I fell in love with classical music. I think I was attracted by its complexity – the feeling that someone had honed their craft and dedicated their entire life to making a musical statement has always inspirational to me. I remember feeling the same way when I had my first introduction to prog music – I got the same impression that this was music that had an artist’s heart and soul poured into every note, pure musical expression.

What is your first musical memory?

My first musical memory probably comes from before I was born. When my mother was pregnant, she used to play Debussy’s Clair De Lune to her bump! As a result, I’ve always had an affinity with the piece – the first time I heard it, it felt familiar to me, like I’d always known it. I’ve always felt a strong connection with the piece, and so when I started to arrange classical music for an album, this was the first piece I knew I wanted to tackle.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

I think musical inspiration comes from every aspect of my life, but for Preludes & Etudes I felt inspired to present the electric guitar as a classical instrument: playing the music I love on the instrument I love. I wanted to strip the instrument back to its basic elements and record it in the same way a classical instrument would be captured on tape. So what you hear is just a single guitar, going straight into a vintage valve amp – no effects, no overdubs, no digital plug-ins – just lots of practice!

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

Chopin’s Etude Op.10 #4 is the opening track from the album and features Simon Fitzpatrick (fellow Carl Palmer Band member) on bass. I arranged Chopin’s solo piano piece for guitar and bass by splitting the left and right hand parts between the two instruments. The result is an exciting duel between the two instruments.

Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when arranging a piece?

When arranging a piece of music I try to use a variety of techniques and sonic approaches. For me, music has to be constantly changing to maintain my interest, so I’ll always look for a variety of ways to approach the same piece, in an attempt to keep an audience’s attention.

What is your method of arranging?

For the pieces on Preludes & Etudes I started with the original score and tried to stay as close to what the composers intended. There are a few pieces where I had to change certain lines that were impossible to play on the guitar – either they contained intervals too wide to be fingered or they went outside the instrument’s range. In a few cases I had to change the keys in order to make them fit the guitar’s range or, in the case of Clair De Lune, transpose to facilitate the use of sustained open string notes. I wrote an accompanying transcription book for the album, include tabs of every tune as well as performance notes, gear settings, details of how I approached each arrangement and biogs of each composer. The book also comes with two CD’s (backing tracks & soloed guitar parts) and is available from my website.

Paul BielatowiczHow do you see your music evolving?

I’ve been playing the material from Preludes & Etudes live – it’s been really encouraging to see and hear people’s reactions. The next project I have in the pipeline will consist of my own compositions, drawing from my love of classical music and continuing on from Preludes & Etudes.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

For me, I think it can be summed up in three sentences:

Play the music you love. Don’t fall into the trap of playing something just because you think you should or that’s what people expect of you – you’ll never be happy doing that.

Find your own voice. What’s the point of trying to recreate something that’s already out there? If you have a favourite band, then their influence will naturally come through in your music, but there’s no need for you to try to sound like them – what’s that offering the world when the original is already out there?

If it sounds good to you, then it IS good. Music is art, some people will like your music, others won’t. There are some people who hate Beethoven or Mozart, but that doesn’t take away from the perfection of their art.

What are you looking forward to?

The release of Preludes & Etudes marks the beginning of my solo career, and I’m really excited to see where it’s going to take me. I’ve spent the past decade playing with some big names in the prog world (Carl Palmer, Neal Morse), and that’s been an amazing experience, but the feeling of expressing myself through my own music is like nothing else.

Links:

http://paulbielatowicz.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Paul-Bielatowicz/68797071299

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

False Coda on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Progstravaganza Questionnaire: False Coda

False Coda were formed back in 2009 by the brothers Vasilis Milios (guitar) and Andrew Milios (drums). After several lineup changes, in 2011 Nikos Pogkas (ex- Shiverspine) and Lefteris Kapetanios (keyboards) joined in. A few months later Manos Xanthakis (ex-Agnosia, ex-Jericho, ex-Blazon (UK), ex-Celestial Ode) became the bands lead singer. Since then False Coda have been active performing live gigs all around athens and in November 2013 finished the recording of their debut album “Closer to the Edge”.Nowadays they signed with ” Steel Gallery Records” and prepare for their first official work to be released. They can be labeled as a progressive metal band with many influences from different genres such as heavy metal, prog rock, fusion, classical music etc).

The band has recently appearead on our Progstravaganza XIX: Convergence compilation and they answered the Progstravaganza Questionnaire.

How did you come to do what you do?

Only the passion for making music.

What is your first musical memory?

One of my fathers mix tape containing J. s Bach nutcracker suite and a compilation from the beatles. Epic stuff!

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

At the early years we were trying to mimic what other bands were doing. Bands we loved and admired (Dream Theater, Rush, Symphony X etc).I believe it was an effort to deconstruct and understand what was so special and unique about their music.

Nowadays Inspiration comes not only from other genres (jazz,fusion,classical etc) but other forms of art and science (film, poetry, philosophy, literature).

What message does the song on our Progstravaganza compilation carry?

Well the title of the song (Respect) is pretty self explanatory i guess. Basically it’sabout keeping your head high,standin up for yourself and not letting anyone tell you what you should think, say or how you should live your life. When you are a kind, respectfull person you should definitely demand some respect from the other side as well. That being said It is also a social issue that is a very common thing here in our country (Greece) about the way artists, especially musicians are treated. Tryin to make a living through music is already an almost impossible thing, society doesnt respect all the hard work one needs to do what he loves most. As a result we are mostly viewed as “entertainers” rather than artists.


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Do you tend to follow any pre-defined patterns when composing a piece?

I have some patterns I like to use for some of my own compositions. I prefer to first write lyrics and then lay down the melodies and riffs. This can be a bit time consuming and frustrating at times, but I feel it’s adding a lot to the originality of the songs.

What is your method of songwriting?

As mentioned above lyrics come first. So that sets the theme and tone of the track. For instance we just finished a new one and it’s based on the film of Akira Kurosawa ” Throne of blood”. Immediately the music became a blend of prog /Japanese /folk elements with lots of Cacophony like arpeggios thrown in the mix.

Some other songs are ideas and random riffs that come up either when practicing, or when we are jamming all together during the rehearsals. Pretty straight forward stuff I guess.

How do you see your music evolving?

I believe that through experience we find that fine balance between “complicated” and “simple”. I guess for me that is the ultimate goal. Playing musical challenging stuff but making it simple and accessible for all at the same time.

What advice would you give to other musicians, trying to make inspired music and get it out in the world?

First of all learn the tools of the trade. Get acquainted with the rules, techniques so later you can shape them at your own hearts desire. But most important never give up.

What are you looking forward to?

For the time being promoting the album, performing but most of all focusing on the new material.

Links:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCS_L01g1hLpdRMa-8N5LxSw

https://www.facebook.com/FalseCoda

Bands, send your music submissions for the Progstravaganza compilation series to info@prog-sphere.com

Progstravaganza XIX: Convergence

Progstravaganza XIX: Convergence Out Now

The nineteenth edition of Prog Sphere‘s Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation series brings 39 bands. 38 bands are for the first time on the Progstravaganza compilation, as Eyot previously took part on Progstravaganza VI. Having said that, there are 430 bands in total that paraded through the Progstravaganza compilation series.

Progstravaganza XIX is titled Convergence, and the album art was once again done by amazing artist Chris van der Linden from LindenArtwork. Speaking about the sampler’s name and design, Chris said:

With the successful Progstravaganza sampler series nearing its 20th edition milestone, we thought it would be nice to call this edition Convergence. Things have been gradually come into form, getting better with each release. Prog Sphere and all the bands have continued to work hard to deliver something stellar with each new compilation, and I wanted to reflect that journey and grand feeling into the artwork. Something mysterious is going on, something big, pulling strong, drawing ever closer…”

As you noticed, we are nearing the 20th edition in the series, and we are thinking of doing something special for that occasion. The bands interested in taking part on Progstravaganza XX (to be titled later) can contact us at info@prog-sphere.com

But for now, let’s focus on Progstravaganza XIX and great 39 tunes it brings. Check them below and head over to our Bandcamp to grab this sampler.

Fuseboxx on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Fuseboxx

Formed in 2001, their existence can very well be said to be the catalyst and inspiration which opened the doors to progressive music in the Philippines. They received widespread acclaim for their musical-precision and technical proficiency. This, especially so for their ability to meld and incorporate Filipino sentimentality with the different musical elements from a vast array of genres (rock, fusion, pop, classical, new age, metal, alternative, etc.) in order to create cohesive and thematic materials—indeed, arranging their music into movements that convey a compelling musical message.

Inspired by the likes of Rush, King Crimson, and other prog-rock dramatists, Fuseboxx’s songs have got some serious delivery of striking guitar/synth solos, choral and orchestral penetration, cascading notes, meditative and groovy drumming. This strip-away balance has poised them to go experimental, not limiting them to voyage on a broader musical scope. Yes, they’re not prog-rock purists. And progressive rock is not really about being mean and being conforming, as it is more on discipline and technique. It could go along from funky to glam, from punchy to just merely trite.

In 2013, they were featured on Classic Rock Presents: Prog, an international magazine published monthly in the United Kingdom that features progressive artists and bands from all over. This marks the second time that Fuseboxx is featured in the illustrious magazine (Issue #38) which has also featured progressive music giants Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull) and Mike Portnoy (formerly of Dream Theater). The story, written by Natasha Scharf, was printed in the magazine’s Limelight section, which is reserved for prog bands considered new blood. It speaks of Fuseboxx as a progressive band with a clear mission. Fuseboxx was first featured in Classic Rock Presents: Prog’s 34th issue, in the same year, where the catchy cut No Glory from their Sophomore album ANIMATED, was also included in the magazine’s limited-edition CD compilation Prog Unsigned.

Considered as one of the strongest local live acts in the Philippines, they leave any rock fan, musician or musical critic breathless with their ability to constantly amaze the audience—as much because of their complex arrangements and musical dexterity as the apparent passion each member puts into the creation and performance of their music.

Links:

www.fuseboxx.ph

https://www.facebook.com/fuseboxx/

Vicinity on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

Vicinity

Vicinity was founded in 2006 by Kim-Marius H. Olsen, Frode Lillevold and Kristian Nergård. Vocalist Alexander K. Lykke soon joined the blend making the first complete lineup. The band wrote and later recorded a demo in 2007 at Skansen Lydstudio in Trondheim, but it was the following year’s recording of the EP “Diffusion of Innovation” that the band found it’s true style, writing longer, more technical progressive compositions. The EP was recorded at Toproom Studios and mixed by Børge Finstad in one week, and released two years later (2010) by Pug-Nose Records.

In 2012 the band felt they had written enough good songs to record their debut album; “Awakening”. Drums were laid down in Trondheim Studio in february, and the following months bass, guitars and vocals were laid down, making this the debut recording of the new bass player Pierre-Nicolai H. Schmidt-Melbye, who joined the band following Nergård’s departure in 2009. Reidulf Wormdal joined the recording as a session keyboard player to add a little extra spice to the mix.

The album was mixed by André Alvnizi at Fascination Street Studios, and mastered by Jens Bogren, also at Fascination Street, and will be released by Indie Distribution and Pug-Nose Records, fall 2013. Shortly prior to the bands release concert they got in touch with keyboard player Ivar Andreas Nyland, who following an audition turned out to be the perfect match for Vicinity both socially and musically. At the end of the year Vicinity was named one of the most promising new bands by P3 Pyro, the biggest metal radio show on national radio.

Early in 2014 the band joined forces with fellow proggers Withem and Tritonus and performed at Gamla in Oslo.

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/vicinityband

The Parallax on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

The Parallax

The Parallax is a four piece progressive melodic death metal band from Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. They released their debut full length album, ‘Obliquity of the Ecliptic’, worldwide physically and digitally on October 23, 2013. It includes their 23-minute epic track ‘The Reformatting’. The album has been received well, and has taken notice in Canada, Russia, Japan, the USA, and many countries in Europe. It can be downloaded for free on their Bandcamp. They released their music video for ‘Seventeen’ on January 9th, 2014.

The Parallax has had the opportunity to share the stage with acts such as Dark Tranquillity, Protest the Hero, The Ocean, Intervals, The Agonist, Ever Forthright, Omnium Gatherum, The Atlas Moth, Exmortus, and many other great acts. The Parallax also recently competed in the Wacken Metal Battle Canada, to which they made the Toronto semi-finals.

The future looks bright for The Parallax as they begin planning tours, and writing their follow-up full-length to ‘Obliquity of the Ecliptic’.

Links:

www.theparallax.net
www.facebook.com/theparallaxband
http://theparallaxband.bandcamp.com
www.twitter.com/theparallaxband
www.instagram.com/theparallax

The Madeleine Haze on Progstravaganza progressive rock & metal compilation

The Madeleine Haze

Progressive Hard Rock trio The Madeleine Haze began as an acoustic solo project for vocalist/guitarist Zack Goebbel. Inspired by French novelist Marcel Proust’s “episode of the madeleine” and the connection between music and involuntary memory, he released “In Search of Lost Time,” an intensely personal EP that became an unexpected regional success.

Zack assembled a band and the sound quickly evolved into a mix of classic Hard Rock and modern Post-Grunge. The resulting politically-charged EP, A More Perfect Union, was a clear sign that this was not a band who was afraid to challenge the listener both musically and lyrically. During this time they also contributed a cover of the anti-war anthem “Killer of Giants” to the “No More Tears: A Millennium Tribute to Ozzy Osbourne- 1971 – 2012” compilation. The band supported these releases with headlining tours across the US, and provided support for acts such as Adrenaline Mob, Vicious Rumors, Seven Witches, Super Bob, Bulletboys and Broken Teeth.

With growing national success came pressure from the industry to conform to a narrow view of what a mainstream Hard Rock band should be. Rather than limit themselves to those stifling constraints, however, the band became more creatively ambitious than ever. The result is Noble Lies & Pious Frauds, a ground-breaking full-length album set for release in the Fall of 2014. Thematically, the album serves as commentary on how corporations, religious and political institutions and even the people we love can manipulate how we think and act. Musically, the band incorporates everything from thrashing Prog-Metal to radio-friendly power ballads, bringing disparate genres together to create a cohesive whole. With crowd-pleasing hooks and virtuosic musicianship, The Madeleine Haze proudly walks the line between the Mainstream and the Progressive fringe, and trusts their fans to take that journey with them.

Links:

http://www.facebook.com/themadhaze
http://www.youtube.com/themadhaze
http://www.myspace.com/themadhaze